Gloucester Rowing Club RP3 trial (December 2012) video

Video Analysis

Following on from yesterday’s technique assessment of the progress our athletes are making.

We always try to video our rowers when they start using the RP3. We can give them visual feedback during the session and make some quick technical changes which aren’t always as easy to perform in the boat.

Here are some examples:

This video shows a promising novice sculler from the Women’s Squad. She is slow to get her weight onto her feet on the recovery. The straight-arm exercise really highlights the difference of weight on the seat (dragging the seat towards the machine) and when weight is over onto the feet (allowing the machine to move towards the seat).

The videos above show two of our Development Squad women who learnt to row last year. Both keep their weight back on the seat and let the knees rise before the weight is forward. The handle only just clears the knees as they are lifting too early. Working on exaggerated fast hands and sequencing shows improvement.  The hips are more active; the pelvis rotates forwards a bit more. The knees are starting to be held until the shoulder is in front of the hip and the hands are well ahead of the knees.

This men’s squad rower ergs with typical ‘ergo technique’, drawing the handle high and to the chest. He leaves no room for the ‘circle’ of the handle down and away at backstops. This causes a break in rhythm as the stroke doesn’t flow. It is also a slower movement as the speed of the handle can’t just be turned around, it must be stopped before being moved away. He made improvements by releasing the stroke just in front of the body and carrying the handle speed around the turn. This improved sequence and rhythm at backstops.

Our masters rowers have also been working on technique on the RP3. Those who find the static ergs too harsh, or incompatible with long-term injuries, are able to use the RP3 without the same issues.

 

On our next update we’ll show you how we’ve been using the RP3 to work on the catch and drive phases of the stroke.

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